Curren Environmental Blog

Go Green in 2019

Posted by david sulock on Jan 2, 2019 10:41:00 AM

Curren Environmental is a professional environmental consulting firm, follow our top easy to follow environmentally friendly “Green” changes that you can make to help the environment.

Stop using plastic water bottles.

Plastic from single use water bottles end up in landfills and our bodies of water.  Trillions of pieces of plastic are estimated to be in our oceans.  Fish will consume this plastic and pass it along to humans.

Bottom line: There are many reusable waters bottles you can use to quench your thirst and more than likely your tap water is as pure if not purer than what is in a plastic water bottle.

Islands of HawaiiStart reusing your reusable shopping bags.

Clearly when states ban plastic bags or charge a tax to use them you know there is a serious issue.   Consumer use of reusable bags is well below 50%.

Bottom Line:   When you go to the store bring your bags and put you phone in a reusable bag.  You won’t forget your phone when you go into the store and now you won’t forget your reusable bag.

LED bulbs are finally affordable. Swap out incandescent bulbs with LEDs

Bottom Line:  LED bulbs use 95% of energy to convert to light so only 5% is wasted.  LED bulbs are on average 80% more efficient that incandescent.  Where can you get an 80% improvement?

Use cold or warm water in your laundry.

Laundry detergent manufacturers have reformulated their products to be as efficient in cold and warm water, hot is not required.     

Bottom line: Hot water consumes energy and is not necessary for cleaning clothing

Lock all windows.

Bottom Line: Windows are drafty and most windows that are unlocked allow cold air to infiltrate into your home. Drafty homes cause furnaces to work harder costing you more money.

Wrap your hot water heater.

Bottom Line: Layers keep you warm, and although hot water heaters have insulation built in, another layer of insulation will increase the efficiency of your hot water heater, which is used every day.

wrapping the hot water heater

Mold Growth. Learn Fact from Fiction.

Posted by Tiffany Byrne on Dec 20, 2018 11:09:00 AM

Fact: Mold needs water to grow.

“There is always some mold everywhere – in the air and on many surfaces. Molds have been on the Earth for millions of years. Mold grows where there is moisture”

From CDC (Center for Disease Control)

When you see mold, it indicates water issues - water is the fuel that propels mold growth.

Fiction: The leak just went away.

No, the leak didn’t just “go away” it was diverted and is leaking into a different part of your home. The leak could also happen when certain conditions are met, such as rain from a Northeastern direction or when your guests are using the spare bathroom. Take care of any leak be it  roof, bathroom or basement right away before it can turn into mold growth.

Promptly fixing leaky roofs, windows, and pipes will save you from mold. Mold growth can begin to occur 48 to 72 hours after water/moisture appears on organic surfaces.

Fact: Mold comes in many different colors, green, yellow, black, white…etc. 

Mold Color Collage

Fiction: Black mold is the bad toxic mold.

Black toxic mold is a myth. There is a mold of color that is black but there is no such mold as the “black toxic mold”. There are thousands of mold spores that have different colors and have different health effects. Find out more at Types of Mold. 

 

Humidity caused mold

Fact: Mold growth can occur due to excess humidity.

When your home does not have the proper (habitable) humidity and temperature inside, mold growth can occur, without any water leaks. American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHREA), recommends 30 to 60% RH (Relative Humidity) indoors. (Read more here).

 

 

Fiction: Houses do not need gutters.

House needs gutters

When you don’t have any gutters, rain water falls directly adjacent to the dwelling foundation. This water can cause damage to foundation and find a pathway into your home. In the image, no gutters were installed and water drained into  the crawl space, causing mold growth. The HVAC system was located in the crawl space, where airborne mold spores were brought into the HVAC from the crawl space and distributed throughout the entire house. This caused a musty smell, and after air sampling, showed high levels of mold spores.

Fact: Exposure to damp and mold environments may cause health effects.

Many government organizations (EPA, CDC, Health Canada) agree that water damaged building materials can have adverse health effects to humans exposed to these materials. Who is most likely to be affected by mold depends on the sensitivity of those exposed. People with allergies may have more severe reactions to mold. Those that are immune compromised, have chronic lung illness, infants and young children or the elderly are also more likely to have an allergic reaction to mold growth.

Fiction: Any exposure to mold will cause health effects.

Again – mold is everywhere. It is inside and outside and everyone has different reactions to different types of mold spores. The specific type of reaction a person will have to mold depends on that person.

More Facts:

Fact: Subterranean spaces need dehumidifiers.

 Dehumidifier

True. Managing relative humidity is key to preventing mold growth. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHREA), recommends 30 to 60% RH (Relative Humidity). Subterranean spaces such as basements and crawl spaces by nature have higher relative humidity, which can be controlled by utilizing a dehumidifier.

Fact: Mold can be carried into your home by attaching itself to clothing, shoes, bags and pets.

True, old books, magazine and cardboard boxes can harbor mold spores. Pets that go outside and stay in the bushes or lay in the grass bring mold into the home. 

Fact: Mold can grow inside during cold weather.

In the winter, when buildings are heated, mold often grows in cold, uninsulated exterior windows and walls, including uninsulated closets along exterior walls where building surfaces are generally cold relative to the indoor air temperature. These temperature differentials can allow condensation and are associated mold growth.

Fact: Temperature affects mold growth.

Different types of mold have minimum, optimum and maximum temperature ranges for growth. Many fungi grow well at temperatures between 60- and 80-degrees Fahrenheit, which are also ideal temperatures for human comfort. In addition, as mentioned above, temperature gradients often produce the moisture needed for mold growth. The relative temperature will dictate what type molds are more likely to grow in a that given environment.

Questions? Call Curren Environmental at 856-858-9509 or email us now at info@currenenvironmental.com.

Tags: mold

Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze!

Posted by Tiffany Byrne on Nov 15, 2018 8:35:00 AM

There are many horror stories regarding pipes freezing. Pipes freezing can lead to bigger problems. Don’t let this be your story…

Before vacation a family prepped the house for departure - they closed and locked all doors, left some lights on and turned down the heat (50 degrees). The family even called a local friend to keep an eye on the home. But what they didn't pay attention to was that that the temperatures plummeted to below freezing. The family forgot to turn off their outside plumbing hose bibs.  The pipes froze to the outdoors. Two days later the temperature rose to above freezing and the pipes burst. Water poured into the basement. The water stayed there for more than 48 to 72 hours allowing for mold growth. Don’t let this happen to your home.

 

Outdoor pipes freeze

11 Tips for keeping your pipes from freezing during the colder months:

  • Disconnect and drain garden hoses from the outdoor faucets (NOW).
  • Turn off water inside the home to these bibs.
  • Insulate your pipes. Insulate all hot and cold water pipes located in the crawlspace as well as under your house and in in the basement, attic, and exterior walls (if accessible) with snap-on foam insulation https://www.lowes.com/pd/Frost-King-0-75-in-x-6-ft-Foam-Plumbing-Tubular-Pipe-Insulation/3133245. Make sure foam insulation fits tightly without gaps.
  • Secure the basement doors and close and weather strip the exterior basement windows and doors.
  • When you leave your home in winter, drip both your hot and your cold water faucets in the kitchen and bathrooms. This helps keep water moving through the pipes and relieves built-up water pressure in the pipes if they should freeze. Pay particular attention to the pipes running in the outside walls.
  • Turn off your sprinkler system and make sure you blow out compressed air through the irrigation lines to ensure the water is drained (October or November) If the water is not drained it can freeze inside the lines damaging your expensive water system.
  • In your laundry room, turn off the water valves to the washer and dryer.  The hoses hold pressure which builds up the longer the washer and dryer are not used.  
  • Open up the cabinet doors under the sinks in the kitchen and bath if they are on exterior walls to allow heat to flow through to the interior pipes.
  • Wrap your water heater with an approved manufacturer’s blanket.
  • Don’t set thermostat lower than 55 degrees when traveling. Ask a neighbor to check on your house during below freezing temperatures.
  • Keep your garage doors closed during extreme cold weather.

IMG_5978

 

Remember don’t let the temperature in your house get too low. If you have a second home and you do not turn off the water make sure the heat is turned on at a temperature of 55 or higher. Make sure you use the tips above…since you are not at that location all of the time and if the pipes burst/thaw and you will have a water problem. If that water problems sits for more than 48 to 72 hours than your problem becomes more than a water problem. It becomes a mold problem.

What do you do if your pipes freeze? Locate the main cut-off valve and have the water cut-off key handy before attempting to thaw out the frozen pipes. Open the faucet the pipe runs to before actually thawing the frozen pipe to allow water to flow through the pipe and relieve any built up pressure in the pipe. You could also use a hair dryer, heat lamp or a portable space heather to thaw out the frozen pipes to help with any pressure built up in the pipe

Whether you are home or away, don’t let your pipes burst - make sure you follow the above 10 tips to keep your pipes from freezing.

 

Tags: Mold Testing

How to remove an oil tank.

Posted by David C Sulock on Nov 5, 2018 10:14:32 AM

 

How to remove an oil tank.

The northeast United States has a long history of oil heat. Oil tanks were commonly used starting in the early 1900s until the 1980s The EPA was not formed until 1970, so oil tanks and environmental regulations did not grow up together.  Today the liability of oil tank leaks is well known and both buyers and sellers

The concern regarding an oil tank is any tank has a chance to leak. If a tank leaks, there can be a cleanup expense involved. This expense falls upon the owner of the property at the time of discovery. Try selling a house with an oil tank and learn that the buyers want a home not an oil tank leak. The fact is a new tank today has a 10-year warranty (yes there are tanks with longer warranties, but those are quite expensive), so nearly all tanks in use today have reached what would be considered a reasonable life expectancy. Couple that with the fact that if your tank is leaking, it most commonly happens along the very bottom of the tank where the most corrosion occurs, so you would never actually detect that the tank is leaking. Quite frankly, no tank owner is going to miss drips of oil from a tank.

 

Heating oil tank systems new jersey

 

So, you have an old tank, a house you want to sell and a dilemma, do you remove the tank like a proactive reasonable person would do, or do you stick your feet in the sand and sell the house as is? Well rest assured your buyer has read this web site, or their attorney, or realtor has and they know the issues with oil tanks. We find a sale has to fall through 3 times or the house has to be on the market for 6 months or more before the seller accepts the fact that an oil tank is not as appealing as walk in closets and an open floor plan, buyers will take a hard pass.

So now the tank owner is looking to have the tank removed. A little internet search or a reference from someone leads them to a company happy to remove the tank. Cheapest price, absolutely that is what they want. Does the removal company even discuss the possible outcomes of the tank leaking? No they don't, they don't want to scare you and quite frankly you don't want to be scared, you're a tank expert, you know your tank isn't leaking and hey oil comes from the ground and you're pretty good about recycling so you're a green person.

Let me point out some pitfalls about removing your oil tank.

The cheapest price includes the worst service and you will wind up paying more in the end, 90% of the time. The cheap person wants to find a leaking tank because that is where the big costs are. Read the tank contract, it will be brief, but it needs to include the following and most will not.  We know this as we get many phone calls from people complaining about the firm that removed their oil tank.

Soil Sampling

You think you do not want it, but the buyer wants to know if the tank leaked how you know 100% is via soil testing. Like cholesterol, you do not know the levels unless you test.

You should always include sample acquisition and analysis with a tank removal. Samples on average cost $120.00 each or $240.00 on most tank removal sites. This is cheaper to do when you are on site to remove the tank. If you have to go back to the site and drill to obtain soil samples expect it to cost thousands. Sampling is even more important when a tank sweep is performed and a tank is found on a site, meaning, a tank that was not in use and not known to exist.

Hole found in the tank

Let us agree that things are not made to last forever, things wear out, is it really a shock to remove an oil tank that is 20, 30, 40, 50 years old and find a hole in it. I mean is that out of the realm of possibility? If you were not informed of this possibility, be prepared to be taken advantage of, tank leaks, not all of them but some. To manage expectations the company that removes your tank should explain what will happen if your tank does or does not leak. To be clear if there are holes in the tank, the local construction office will flag the tank as leaking and have you report the leak to the state. The reason being a hole in a tank is reasonable cause to believe that the tank leaked. So now, you are tasked with proving it did not leak or does not need remediation. In the meantime, the tank removal company will be giving you a quote that is many times more expensive to remediate the leak.

 

2018-06-27 10.16.15

 

The tank had holes and you are told you must remediate.

If a tank leak is found you MUST test to see if levels are above or below standard.  If you do not test than it is going to be assumed you must remediate, prepare to open your checkbook.

If you have a tank leak and you test and oil levels are so high that you need to remediate then your next real step is to define the area requiring remediation, this is called delineation.

Delineation is meant to define the area of contamination (and verify that contamination exists). Smaller areas are faster and less expensive to define, larger areas take longer. Larger areas can extend across property boundaries and below structures, which can require overcoming access issues regarding sampling these areas. The first step which maybe the only step required is sampling immediately around the tank area.

 

1-888-301-1050

Tank Closure Report

Did you know that commercial tanks all require a report to be submitted to the state to document the work? Why, the state wants to know if the tank leaked. Therefore, every company is used to completing reports of tank removal work. Clearly, any tank raises questions with owners/purchasers of a property, so why wouldn't you want a report of removal? You do and you should have a report, when contract. These reports explain the work in laymans terms regarding the tank work and if there was a leak, it will also outline why you do or do not need remediation. Having a report documenting that a removed tank did not leak is an important document to have.

Bottom line, every tank needs a report documenting removal. Be it a leaking tank or a non leaker, if your contract makes no reference to any report,  I wouldn't sign it.

Curren has completed thousands of tanks, one month we completed closure on 129 tanks. That said, we do not remove every tank in the tri-state area, but we get calls from property owners who hired someone else to remove their tank and they feel like they are being treated unfairly. Meaning they were unprepared to find that the tank leaked. In practice, I don't expect a property owner who has never removed an oil tank and never will again to be all knowing about the tank removals and tank leaks, but I expect the company performing the work to know and to clearly explain the process and the scenarios you can encounter.

The follow exert is from a tank removal contact from a company I would have run away from. Give it a quick read:

  • Obtain necessary permit from municipality
  • Phone in utility mark out to NJ One Call
  • Excavate to expose tank
  • Remove overburden soil covering UST
  • Remove and dispose of concrete adjacent to UST.
  • Saw cut the UST to allow for hand cleaning
  • Properly clean the UST interior
  • Remove the UST, and dispose of at a properly facility

This scope assumes the tank is not leaking. Bottom line the scope they gave was not meant to really satisfy you if the tank leaked, which was clearly a possibility. They don't even include soil sampling or a report so if the tank doesn't leak you don't get a report saying so. If the tank did leak, no sampling is include, which is so wrong, you need to test as every state allows a permissible amount of oil to remain, like cholesterol there are good and bad levels.  How else do you know if you need to remediate?

We can only hope you are reading this before you get your tank removed. If so, call our office you will walk away a lot more informed and better prepared to manage this project. If you are calling after your tank was removed and it leaked, call us, we can discuss your options. Most leaking tanks will require the contamination to be delineated, which we do. We can define your problem, develop costs to remediate as well as data to you that you can solicit other quotes for remediation.

 

Monday to Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm   888-301-1050

 

Tags: NJDEP HOTS, oil tank, oil tank removal nj, oil tank removal

NJDEP HOTS  aka Heating Oil Tank Regulation Changes

Posted by david sulock on Oct 16, 2018 7:49:10 AM

Residential heating oil tanks are regulated in New Jersey by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). 

On August 6, 2018, the NJDEP adopted new rules governing the administrative and technical requirements for the remediation of a discharge of heating oil from Heating Oil Tank Systems (HOTS) (N.J.A.C. 7:26F). These proposed rule changes have been in the works for years. The old program was called UHOT, the new program is called HOTS.  Tank that fall into the NJDEP HOTS regulations are:

Residential Aboveground heating oil tanks (ASTs). 

Small Aboveground non-residential heating oil tank systems.

Underground Heating Oil Tank System (2,000 gallons or less in capacity).

 NJDEP HOTS

Generally speaking most HOTS tanks are residential sites.

The idea behind a system for residential sites is to be able to expedite leaks associated with these tanks, as issues with leaking oil tanks arise during real estate transactions.  Ultimately following the HOTS program for a leaking tank will provide the RP (responsible party) typically the owner with a No Further Action  letter (NFA).

 

The main changes in the UHOT to HOTS regulations are as follows:

  • When soils are present above NJDEP standards beneath a residential structure, up to 15 cubic yards can remain in place, which would require a HOTS deed notice. In short, the presence of the contamination would be noted on the deed.  Some buyers may be turned off by this contamination remaining which could affect the value of the property.
  • Remedial excavation bottom samples are now determined by the size of the tank as opposed as to the size of the excavation. Previously the number of bottom samples was based on the excavation size J.A.C. 7:26F-3.4(a)2i(1) “ Collect one sample for every six feet of tank length or fraction thereof.  For a 550 gallon oil tank you would take four sidewalls and one bottom.  You would need additional bottom samples if the tank is longer than 6 feet.
  • If a remedial excavation extends to within two feet of groundwater or bedrock, a ground water investigation is required;
  • If groundwater is not encountered to a depth of 35 into bedrock after 24 hours, no further groundwater remediation is required.
  • Confirmatory groundwater sampling is not required if initial ground water results are below the NJDEP Ground Water Quality Standards (GWQS) upon completion of the remediation.

Curren has completed thousands of tank projects, both simple tank removals and remediations.  If you have a HOTS question, contact our office, we offer a free initial consultation.

Monday to Friday 8 AM to 5 PM

888-301-1050

 

NJDEP HOTS

 

Tags: NJ HOTS, NJDEP HOTS

Is my residential heating oil tank regulated in New Jersey?

Posted by david sulock on Sep 25, 2018 8:43:32 AM

Is my residential heating oil tank regulated in New Jersey?

 

Heating oil tanks are unregulated by the NJDEP in New Jersey as they used to be called UHOTs (Unregulated heating oil tanks).   Work performed on abandoning an oil tank is governed by the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) Bulletin No.: 95-1B. Discharges or leaks from these tanks are regulated by the  Department of Environmental Protection’s Unregulated Heating Oil Tank (UHOT) Program.

 NJ oil tank removal

Let us not get ahead of ourselves.  First, to work on a heating oil tank in New Jersey you must be licensed by the NJDEP. The NJDEP certifies individuals and firms that perform services on unregulated heating oil tanks.  To be technical, N.J.A.C. 7:14B defines unregulated heating oil tanks as, “any one or combination of tanks, including appurtenant pipes, lines, fixtures, and other related equipment, used to contain an accumulation of heating oil for on-site consumption in a residential building, or those tanks with a capacity of 2,000 gallons or less used to store heating oil for on-site consumption in a nonresidential building.”

To say it in English and following a federal definition, an underground storage tank is defined as a tank the volume of which, including the volume of the appurtenant pipes, lines, fixtures and other related equipment, is 10 percent or more below the ground.

It is generally recommended that if you own out-of-service underground heating oil tank, it is a good practice to remove the tank.   Takes removed from service such as during gas conversions, rarely ever get placed back into service.   Tanks older than 20 to 30 years are also recommended to be removed as nothing lasts forever. Although tank abandonment is allowed, there has been an increase in previously abandoned tanks being removed. These tank removals are driven by insurance and mortgage companies that do not want the liability associated with underground heating oil tanks, as these tanks can leak and remediation can be thousands of dollars.   

 Tank previously abandoned in place with sand

New Jersey has construction codes and The Uniform Construction Code (UCC) covers oil tanks, but this code is not a retrofit code, and therefore, it does not deal with tanks that have been abandoned for extended periods of time. The UCC applies when a tank is taken out of service as part of a construction project or when the tank has become unsafe. If a project results in an underground tank being out of service for a period of one year, (such as an oil to gas conversion), as per Section 5704.2.13.1.3 of the International Fire Code (IFC), the tank must be removed from the ground in accordance with Section 5704.2.14 of the IFC or abandoned in place in accordance with Section 5704.2.13.1.4 of the IFC. If an aboveground tank is out of service for a period of one year, as per Section 5704.13.2.3 of the IFC, the tank shall be removed in accordance with Section 5704.2.14 of the code.

An oil to gas conversion is an example where a construction activity can trigger the need to address the oil tank.  In this case, the local code officials must ensure that the tank is properly removed or abandoned in connection with the conversion.*

 oil to gas conversion

* The only exception to this would be where the owner can demonstrate a legitimate continued use of the tank.

 

The removal or abandonment of a tank requires an application for and the issuance of a demolition permit regardless of whether it is in connection with other related work. In short, if you are removing or abandoning an oil tank you need a permit.

 

Oil tank removal and abandonment inspections are the responsibility of the of the fire sub-code official as per the IFC, Section 5704.2.13, fuel oil storage systems, as referenced by the International Mechanical Code (Section 1301.5) and the International Residential Code (Section M2201.7). Per N.J.A.C. 5:23-3.4.

 

Proper Abandonment Procedures are detailed in the International Fire Code, Section 5704.2.13.1.4, the American Petroleum Institute (API) Bulletin 1604, and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 30 Annex C relating to the abandonment of underground storage tanks. These documents, which detail procedures for tank abandonment are followed by New Jersey’s applicable regulation as listed in N.J.A.C. 5:23-3.6.

 

Tank Leak Assessment

The construction regulations are not clear regarding who, what, when or how the assessment of a tank for leaks is performed as it is generally not considered a construction activity.  The construction regulations do define that WHEN contamination is found it is to be reported to the NJDEP hotline at 877-927-6337 (877-WARN-DEP).  This is the bear trap owners of tanks face when a tank is removed.  NJDEP regulations chapter 26F HEATING OIL TANK SYSTEM REMEDIATION RULES  Statutory Authority N.J.S.A. 13:1D-9, 58:10-23.11 et seq., 58:10A-1 et seq., 58:10A-21 et seq., 58:10A-37.1 et seq., 58:10B-1 et seq., and 58:10C-1 et seq.  Date last amended August 6, 2018, state that:

 

"Upon discovery of a discharge, the owner shall immediately notify the Department by calling the Department Hotline at 1-877-WARNDEP (1-877-927-6337)."

Therefore, under the NJDEP requirements the owner upon discovering a tank leak must notify the NJDEP spill hotline.

residential oil tank leak

 

Construction Permit Approval

 

The most misunderstood part of the tank closure process is the sign off from the local municipality.  As per the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) Bulletin No.: 95-1B after tank has been removed and properly disposed of, and the excavation is filled with certified clean material, a certificate of approval can be issued by the local construction office and the permit can be closed out.    So once you follow the construction procedures the township can close the permit, if the tank leaked or not.  Again once, you remove and backfill the tank, the municipality is done with their job. Any remediation activity, including the removal of contaminated soil, will then proceed through the Department of Environmental Protection’s Unregulated Heating Oil Tank (UHOT) Program.

Does all this sound confusing?  It should not but it does and the layperson should not be expected to know these procedures or regulations but they are subject to them.

If you want clear-cut answers, call Curren we have been performing tank closures for over 20 years.   Thousands of completed tank projects have made us de facto experts on tanks.

 

1-888-301-1050

Tags: oil tank, oil tank removal nj, oil tank removal, oil tank removal new jersey, NJ HOTS

Does turning UP the Air Conditioner when you leave for the day cause mold growth?

Posted by Tiffany Byrne on Aug 16, 2018 3:19:00 PM

When you leave your home on a hot and humid day, do you turn your air conditioner up past let’s say.... 78 degrees? Do you close all your windows and doors (probably yes for intruders!), and you didn’t have time to close the blinds and curtains? When you return home, if you don’t have the smart thermostat (more on that later), it may be a bit more hot, humid and muggier than when you left bright eyed in the morning - right? Now that is just one day, if you go on vacation for more that just that one day, do you turn your AC up or just plain off?

Mold growth on wood paneling

This may be something you do every day before you leave, and maybe, some days you get back later than others. Maybe, you don’t come back at all that day until after dinner, or when the kids are done their activities. You just provided a prime condition for mold spores and mold growth in your home. During these hot and humid months, Curren recommends the following to keep mold spores and mold growth out of your home:
  • Use your central air conditioning with a higher number MERV filter. MERV stands for Minimum Efficiency Rating Value. The higher the MERV, the better the filter will perform at removing smaller particle sizes. MERV 1 through 4 are designed to remove large particles. MERV 5 through 16 filters remove finer particles. The average particle size efficiency has three ranges: E1 (0.3 to 1 micron), E2 (1 to 3 micron) and E3 (3 to 10 micron) will determine MERV for these products. High MERV filters can help trap the mold spores that are naturally present.
  • Lower your indoor humidity. If your humidity is above 50 percent, then fungi will thrive. Try to keep your humidity at 35 percent.
  • Open doors within your home so air flow is fluent within the space.
  • Use your dehumidifier in your basement and crawl space. Make sure the bucket is being continually emptied, either into a sink or sump pump. The dehumidifier constantly keeps humidity lower in your home.
  • Keep your stove exhaust fan running when you cook, this will stop moisture from being added to the indoor air.
  • Always use your bathroom fan, this grabs the moisture and brings it (hopefully and not to your attic) to the outside.
Photo Aug 09, 11 54 23 AMMost importantly, if you can, keep your air conditioner running at a rate that keeps the humidity down in your home, this reduces mold spore growth and keeps allergens to a minimum. Mold spores can grow in the right environment without having water intrusion, especially on organic materials such as furniture. These mold spores can in-turn become air-borne where you breathe the spores into your lungs.Smart thermostats are Wi-Fi enabled and allow you to have multiple temperature changes throughout the day. Some can alert you when humidity is too high.Read more on Mold Testing and Mold Remediation on Curren Environmental's website.  Have questions?  Fill out the form to the right and Curren will respond immediately. 

7 Things I wish I knew before I removed my oil tank.

Posted by david sulock on Jul 25, 2018 9:11:47 AM

 A construction permit is required and it can take up to 20 business days to get the permit, which is a month.

 I thought that my out of use tank could remain where it was buried.  Nope, the buyer of my house needed a mortgage and to get the mortgage to buy my house, the tank had to be removed. Their attorney also advised that it be removed.   Yep found this out 9 days before settlement.  Did not know the tank removal permit took weeks to get.   Settlement eventually happened but it was 4 weeks later.

 

home tank removal

 

A tank removal report is important.

Had my tank removed no leaks.  Listed house for sale, buyer wanted proof that the tank did not leak.  I had a copy of the contract for the removal and I had a paid tank removal invoice, that was not enough,. The company I hired to remove the oil tank did not give me a report.  Stupid me the contract for removal did not include a report.   I had to pay another company to dig up the old tank grave, test the soils, and give me a report that the tank did not leak.  Apparently, buyers want 100% confirmation that the tank did not leak.  I mean it makes sense you want a report of the tank removal if you are buying a house, but why didn’t the tank removal company tell me that or give me one? 

Tank removal soil sampling is really important.

I was told I did not have to soil test when the tank is removed.  Apparently, testing is not required by law.  Well I removed the tank and it leaked and the immediate diagnosis was $10,000.00 to $15,000.00 to remediate the leak.  When I mean immediate, I mean I had an estimate to clean up the tank leak 2 days after the tank was removed.   I ultimately fired the tank removal company and hired another company.  The new company told me that you could not conclude 100% if remediation is necessary without soil testing.   Bottom line I got the soil tested, yes there was oil; no, it was not enough oil to demand remediation.  Saved the $10,000.00.  Couldn’t the company tell me that testing while not required is worth it if the tanks appears to have leaked.

Not all oil leaks mean you have to remediate.

As I learned, a hole in a tank only means that the company that removed the tank is going to give me an expensive quote to clean up the oil.  Apparently there are legal amounts of oil that can remain in the ground, kind of like good and bad cholesterol, but you would never know unless you test.

 

Holes in oil tank, but oil in bottom of tank

How excited the tank removal company crew would become after they removed my tank and found out it was leaking.

Got my oil tank removed, took the day off from work. The whole thing was very stressful as I bought the house with a sand filed tank and now 10 years later I am selling the house and the buyers want the tank removed.   When the tank was removed and I saw holes in the tank, my heart sank.  The mood of the tank workers was elevated when they saw the holes in the tank   You would think the Philadelphia Eagles won a 2nd super bowl.   I feel like they were leading me down a path to spend money I didn’t plan for or have.   Look I understand tank leaks but I was never told about what happens when a tank leaks.  It was upsetting that they were happy for by problems.

Getting something in writing is really important.

I hired a tank company to do my tank removal.  They talked a good game and had a very good price.   They had a 2-page proposal, it was brief and somewhat vague now that I think about it.  Well when I found out my tank leaked soil testing which I thought was done or would be done (we did speak about it) was not done.  They actually took a soil sample but it was not for determining if the oil level in the ground was legal it for the disposal of the soil.  I was presumed guilty.    I was more than a little miffed; I didn’t want to pay the bill until I got a report of removal.  I didn’t get that either.  I complained to an attorney who reviewed my 2-page quote.  I was told if it is not in the contract the company doesn’t have to do it.  So, I got no testing and no report, but I was told I would if in the small chance my oil tank leaked.   It was a case of he said she said, the attorney agreed it was deceptive but not worth the money to go after legally.

The cheapest price is not the best.

I figured a tank is a tank is a tank, so a tank removal is a tank removal.  I picked the least expensive company.  I thought I compared apples to apples and was picking the shiniest apple.  Well my tank leaked and I was up charged more than 5 times what the cost to remove the tank was.    What I learned from one of the tank company workers who needed to use my bathroom was the company doesn’t make money removing oil tanks.  The cleanup is much more profitable and their goal is to get as many tank removal projects  as possible, which increases their odds of finding a leaking tank.   They are supposed to call the office once they know a tank leaked, I guess to toast to their good fortune but not mine.

These seven snippets of experiences all came from clients of Curren who had their tank removed by another company.

Do something once and you are a novice.

Do something twice, well you are not a pro but you know more than you did the first time.

Bottom line, we have been performing tank projects for over 20 years.  Thousands of tanks tested, removed, and remediated.   Referrals are our largest source of work and we don’t advertise, no ads on the internet promoting Curren Environmental.     We do get many calls from people who after reading our web site and speaking to us wished they called us first for their tank removal.

If you have a tank and you want solid advice and your work professionally done, call our office.  We provide free consultation and estimates.  We have no sales people and 20 years of satisfied clients.  You can be the next one.

Monday to Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm   

888-301-1050

 

Tank Removal Question

 

Professional Tank Removal

 

Tags: oil tank removal pa, oil tank, tank leak, oil tank removal nj, oil tank removal, oil tank removal new jersey, tank removal

Top 10 Reasons Why You Need Mosquito Remediation

Posted by Tiffany Byrne on Jul 20, 2018 9:05:00 AM

10 Reasons for Mosquito Remediation

Curren Environmental spent several years cracking the code on mosquito control.  We figured out a formula that would keep the mosquitoes away and be safe for our clients. Curren keeps mosquitoes from hatching and knocks down mosquitoes that already have hatched on contact.

1. Be able to do yard work and not get attacked by annoying, biting mosquitoes.

When working in the yard - who wants to be bit up by mosquitoes?  Spraying the underside of the bushes, which is what Curren's technicians are trained to do, immediately knocks down the adult mosquito. Curren applies the quick drying barrier spray to foliage, shrubs, under decks, below and around sheds and other cool, moist - shady areas.   

2. Let the kids play outside while the weather is still nice.

Today, all kids want to play inside on their electronics.  It's easy to say "Mom, I'll just get bit by mosquitoes if I go outside".  The barrier spray is sprayed in and around shady areas, those areas include under the trampoline and other shaded areas where the kids can enjoy their time outside.  They won't get bit, they can't use mosquitoes as an excuse to stay "inside" anymore. 

3. Stop applying chemicals to you and your kids, no more purchasing mosquito spray and No More DEET.

Mosquitoes are attracted to scents, and each person - young or old have a certain scent.  To spray a chemical on yourself and/or your child is masking that scent.  Once that "Mosquito Repellent" wears off, you will attract biting, pesky mosquitoes.

4. Mosquitoes spread disease; we all need to avoid that.

Only the female mosquito bites and she bites to feed off your blood.  You may not have been the first meal, meaning that she may have had a meal on a bird or reptile or an amphibian. When the female mosquito bites, she inserts her proboscis (feeding tube) into the skin to penetrate and receive the blood.  To prevent the blood from clotting in the blocking the tube, the female releases a small about of saliva.  While that bite may take merely a second, that is how diseases are transmitted. Learn more at the CDC.  

 {Technician applying the barrier spray} 

5. BBQ without being the mosquitoes’ dinner!

It's time to grill and your outside, you keep getting attacked by mosquitoes. Enjoy the time outside while you make dinner for your friends and/or family without swatting the mosquitoes away.   

6. We live in New Jersey we should be able to enjoy the outdoors and not get driven inside by biting mosquitoes.

Even though this is the State of New Jersey and not some tropical area in the Amazon rain forest,   we are still laden with mosquitoes.  New Jersey is the most densely populated state, making the chances for the mosquito easier to bite you, they don't have to fly as far to find a meal. 

7. No franchise fees and no add-on pricing our service include ticks. Our service is priced for every budget.

Curren Environmental is not a franchise.  We have been in business for over 20 years as an Environmental company serving thousands of customers throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware.  When you call our office, you get a live person, not an answering service.  

8. Safe for children, dogs – adults too!

Curren Environmental's formula is safe for everyone.  Mosquito Remediation is targeted at the mosquito which is typically 3 mm to 6 mm and weighs about 5 mg. The barrier spray is applied to the perimeter of your property and dries within 30 minutes.  Fast enough for quick bite to eat and back outside!

9. Sit on your porch, patio or deck without the nuisance of mosquitoes. Enjoy that cup of coffee in the morning or a glass of wine at night…outside.

By using the Mosquito Remediation, mosquitoes are controlled. The barrier spray is  applied to locations, such as beneath and around your porch,  patio and deck, areas in which you typically want to be, and areas where mosquitoes are hiding waiting to attack you. Thus, the smell of the coffee or the scent of your wine won't attract mosquitoes as you sit outside and either enjoy the sunrise or the sunset. 

10. At your home you are breeding mosquitoes and don’t even know it. At your first spray, Curren will provide you an on-side evaluation on your yard.

At your first spray, Curren will provide you an on-site evaluation.  We will let you know if there are any areas where mosquitoes can find breeding grounds, such as gutters (downspouts), birdbaths, recycling bins, etc.  

Our customers like our service so much that they refer their friends and families.  One of our clients said that they sat in a neighbor’s yard and did not get bitten by mosquitoes after a dinner BBQ and she asked what the secret was to mosquito control.   Once she learned what the “secret” was, she became a Curren customer soon thereafter and has referred many others.

Curren’s Mosquito Remediation controls the mosquito population in your yard so you can enjoy time alone, or with friends and family. Call today at

856-858-7172 or email Tiffany at Tiffany@currenenvironmental.com.

 

Have questions?  Learn more about Mosquitoes here.

 

Tags: mosquito control service, mosquito control

Best Oil Tank Removal

Posted by David C Sulock on Jul 16, 2018 1:31:38 PM

 

If you are involved with an oil tank removal project, it is probable your first tank removal and likely your last. The odds of you making the best decision are slim. Let’s agree that the best tank removal is one where the tank does not leak and you don’t have to remediate.

That said, you could expect a cost for tank removal on average to be about $1,500.00. This cost entails the time to get permits, equipment and labor to excavate the tank, trained personnel to cut open and clean the tank, oil recovery, tank removal, soil sampling, backfill material and labor and ultimately a report from the company so you can document the tank removal. The tank report is completed weeks after removal and is performed in an office utilizing the notes and data collected from your site. Sounds like a lot for $1,500.00, well it is.

 Best oil tank removal

Let’s talk about what makes your tank removal the best tank removal.

Your cost is close to the average cost of $1,500.00. Why, well the firm that sells these services has to do the work at a market rate where they can make money. Otherwise, they are offering the work at a loss, with the plan that they will make the money on the backend, which is the remediation and even a small remediation can cost over $5,000.00. You get what you pay for, remember that.

If you buy a house that had an oil tank, you want to know that the tank did not leak. The only way to know that is if you have testing completed. Being the owner of the tank you may think you do not want to have testing done, or else you may find a problem. After 25 years of dealing with tanks the bottom line question everyone wants to know is if the tank leaked. Buyers and sellers because that answers can make or break a real estate transaction. Bottom line tank soil samples when the tank is removed

Why do many contracts for tank removal not include soil sampling? Short answer, it is cheaper. Soil samples cost $120.00 on average and with two soil samples being the average number acquired sampling can raise the cost by $240.00, plus the time to write a report that talks about the test results. Look, you are removing an old buried metal object, you are fooling yourself if you don’t think that rust and extensively has not occurred to the tank. Your low cost tank removal company is counting on this and will be happy to give you a cost to remediate the tank once contamination is discovered.

Why do many contracts not include a report of the tank removal? Cost again is the culprit. If you write a report you need someone present during tank removal that will be taking notes, photos, soil samples and will eventually sit behind a desk to type a report. That all takes time and there is a cost involved. Bottom line make sure the contract includes a report.

Tank removal site assessment soil samples when acquired for independent laboratory analysis provides quantitative not qualitative data. New Jersey and Pennsylvania have one comparative standard for number two heating oil in soil and that is by laboratory analysis. Visual, oil water agitation or olfactory evaluations have no standards so you have no foundation to lay an opinion.

Residential tank removals do not specifically require that you obtain soil samples. This conflicts with the interest of a purchaser (mortgage or insurance underwriter) for a site when hard data is requested. Legally you do not need to test, if a buyer wants to test prior to purchase it is their due diligence and hence their cost. Obviously it is less expensive to acquire samples from an open excavation at tie of removal, as opposed to post removal and backfilling.

What is the best tank removal? The best is one where testing and a report is provided as part of the tank removal. It is what is required for commercial sites, so why wouldn’t you do the same for a residence?

 

Tank Removal Question

Tags: tank removal, oil tank removal new jersey, oil tank removal, oil tank removal nj, oil tank removal pa